Daniel can do – clip 3

Daniel can do – clip 3


One of the test items for his hands
when he was seven is picking up small pegs and putting them in a holed board
as fast as you can. And the test item
which would match that now is picking up small pegs from a board, turning them over
and putting them back in. So both quite deft manipulative skills. And he found it difficult
when he was seven and he still finds it difficult now, more difficult than somebody else
of his age might do. One more example
to compare the two tests is an example of
walking along a line on the floor. In the seven-year-old test
putting your heel against your toe and maintaining balance
for the whole length of the line, which he found difficult at that time, and in the 12-year-old test you do the same thing
but you walk backwards along the line. One of the test items is jumping
into a row of squares on the floor, which requires quite a lot of control,
particularly when you stop, and Daniel found this quite difficult
at that time. The similar jumping activity
in the 12-year-old test is jumping over a low cord and clapping as you go. He finds this quite hard. He’s worked very hard
at his throwing and catching. Actually, in the second test,
the 12-year-old test, he managed very well and I’m quite sure this is because of
the intensive practice that he’s done when he plays junior rugby, because he really wanted to do it. Daniel’s dad asked me whether I thought that junior rugby
would be a good idea for Daniel, and then described to me
how he ran a junior rugby club and how Daniel was joining it. And he came to visit me
soon after the first assessment in his tracksuit and showed me the actual training
that they did, the formal warm-up training
that they did in between matches. And I got very excited because the kind of way that,
for example, they learn to catch a ball has been broken down
into very small components so that the children
can learn it easily and is really no different from the way that a physiotherapist
would teach a child to catch a ball. The basic movement of the hand
in catching any ball is natural catching where you press
your thumbs together like this and your hands…fingers loose. It’s a natural catching movement. We build it up from there
and it’s all to do with self-confidence. If you’ve got a child with difficulties, define what it is, I believe in what they call
single-dimensional playing. In your own mind’s eye you have a plan where you’re teaching one thing,
then two things. The one and two. The one, two, then a third. The one, two, three,
like a drawing board where eventually, slowly,
the plan comes into place, and it can seem to develop quicker
that way. It’s the nature of the game. It’s the bonding of the players
together, the children, they’re all out there to do a job and they’re all out there
to enjoy the game. That’s the biggest thing.

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